deliciouslydairyfreerecipes:

Melty Cashew Mozzarella Sticks
Cashew Mozzarella:1/2 cup raw cashews, soaked for 2 hours or overnight1/2 cup almond milk2 tsp tapioca starch1 tsp cornstarch or arrowroot starch1/4 tsp agar powder (add 1/4 tsp more for a more set cheese)1/3 - 1/2 tsp fine sea salt (to preference for saltyness of the cheese)1/2 tsp apple cider vinegar1/2 tsp lemon juice1 tsp nutritional yeast2 tsp extra virgin olive oil1 Tbsp vegan butter (or evoo)a generous pinch of kala namak (black salt)a generous pinch of onion powder1/4 tsp pepper flakes (optional, I like a bit of spice kick in my mozzy) Breading:1/4 cup flour Breading Wet:1/4 cup water1/4 cup almond milk2 Tbsp flour1 Tbsp flaxmeal1/4 tsp each of garlic powder, salt, smoked paprika Breading Dry:1/2 cup bread crumbs1/4 tsp each of salt, red pepper flakes, black pepper1/2 tsp italian herb blend (oregano, basil, thyme, rosemary) Method:Make the Mozzarella:Blend everything under mozzarella into a smooth puree. Taste and adjust salt and tang if needed. Pour into a pan and cook at medium heat, stirring frequently to avoid burning, for 8-10 minutes until the mixture is really thick and starts to leave the pan (or is at a soft lightly sticky dough stage).Grease a small bread pan (I used 5.75 by 3 inch pan) or other pan with extra virgin olive oil and drop the mozzarella in it. Even it out using a spatula. Cool completely, cover the pan and Let set in the refrigerator for an hour or more. Set up the Breading station when ready to fry or Bake:Keep flour in one plate.Mix everything under Breading Wet in a bowl.Mix everything under Breading Dry in another deep plate or bowl. Remove the cheese from the pan and Slice the Mozzarella into about 1/4 inch thin slices (I got 12 slices. The cheese will not be a shred-able hard cheese. It should just be set enough to slice). Keep the slices small since the breading is going to increase the size by 2 or 3 times. Roll each slice in flour. Then dip it in the wet mixture, then dip in the breadcrumbs to coat well. Place on parchment lined sheet. Bread all the slices and freeze for 10 minutes. Fry:Heat enough oil in a fryer or deep pan on medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot, add the sticks 2 or 3 at a time to fry. The oil should be hot enough that it takes only a minute to brown one side of the sticks. Flip and cook for another half or 1 minute depending on the heat and quantity of oil. Remove and serve immediately. Wait for a minute before adding the next batch so the oil can come back to a high temperature. Bake:If baking, then freeze the breaded mozzarella for 15 minutes. Pre-heat the oven to 450 degrees F. Remove moxy sticks from freezer, spray oil or brush oil on the sticks. Bake for 4 minutes. Move the sheet to the top level of the oven and Broil for 1 minute or until the breading starts to brown. Remove and serve immediately with marinara, ranch or other favorite sauces.

deliciouslydairyfreerecipes:

Melty Cashew Mozzarella Sticks

Cashew Mozzarella:
1/2 cup raw cashews, soaked for 2 hours or overnight
1/2 cup almond milk
2 tsp tapioca starch
1 tsp cornstarch or arrowroot starch
1/4 tsp agar powder (add 1/4 tsp more for a more set cheese)
1/3 - 1/2 tsp fine sea salt (to preference for saltyness of the cheese)
1/2 tsp apple cider vinegar
1/2 tsp lemon juice
1 tsp nutritional yeast
2 tsp extra virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp vegan butter (or evoo)
a generous pinch of kala namak (black salt)
a generous pinch of onion powder
1/4 tsp pepper flakes (optional, I like a bit of spice kick in my mozzy)

Breading:
1/4 cup flour

Breading Wet:
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup almond milk
2 Tbsp flour
1 Tbsp flaxmeal
1/4 tsp each of garlic powder, salt, smoked paprika

Breading Dry:
1/2 cup bread crumbs
1/4 tsp each of salt, red pepper flakes, black pepper
1/2 tsp italian herb blend (oregano, basil, thyme, rosemary)

Method:
Make the Mozzarella:
Blend everything under mozzarella into a smooth puree. Taste and adjust salt and tang if needed. Pour into a pan and cook at medium heat, stirring frequently to avoid burning, for 8-10 minutes until the mixture is really thick and starts to leave the pan (or is at a soft lightly sticky dough stage).
Grease a small bread pan (I used 5.75 by 3 inch pan) or other pan with extra virgin olive oil and drop the mozzarella in it. Even it out using a spatula. Cool completely, cover the pan and Let set in the refrigerator for an hour or more.

Set up the Breading station when ready to fry or Bake:
Keep flour in one plate.
Mix everything under Breading Wet in a bowl.
Mix everything under Breading Dry in another deep plate or bowl.

Remove the cheese from the pan and Slice the Mozzarella into about 1/4 inch thin slices (I got 12 slices. The cheese will not be a shred-able hard cheese. It should just be set enough to slice). Keep the slices small since the breading is going to increase the size by 2 or 3 times. Roll each slice in flour. Then dip it in the wet mixture, then dip in the breadcrumbs to coat well. Place on parchment lined sheet. Bread all the slices and freeze for 10 minutes.

Fry:
Heat enough oil in a fryer or deep pan on medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot, add the sticks 2 or 3 at a time to fry. The oil should be hot enough that it takes only a minute to brown one side of the sticks. Flip and cook for another half or 1 minute depending on the heat and quantity of oil. Remove and serve immediately. Wait for a minute before adding the next batch so the oil can come back to a high temperature.

Bake:
If baking, then freeze the breaded mozzarella for 15 minutes. Pre-heat the oven to 450 degrees F. Remove moxy sticks from freezer, spray oil or brush oil on the sticks. Bake for 4 minutes. Move the sheet to the top level of the oven and Broil for 1 minute or until the breading starts to brown. Remove and serve immediately with marinara, ranch or other favorite sauces.

(via janedoughxvx)

diagonalminds:

Guinea pigs! 

(via expecto-patr0num)

vegan-vulcan:

I hope all the nonvegans out there have a really nice Claim To Care About The Earth Whilst Also Contributing To The Leading Factors Of Its Destruction Day

(via lettingoff-thehappiness)

Tags: earth day

How to go vegan without breaking the bank: a field guide

seismicwaves:

So one of the biggest concerns a lot of people have about going vegan is cost, because the popular narrative about veganism is that it’s a really expensive way to eat. While it definitely CAN be, it doesn’t have to be and I find that my food cost over-all is lower now than it was when I ate meat. Transitioning to ANY diet that’s radically different from how you currently eat is going to involve a little bit of an up-front investment, but with a little bit of legwork you can really minimize the cost and make it feasible on almost any budget. So, here’s some ideas to keep food costs down while transitioning AND as an established vegan (my average weekly food cost is about $30-40 living the the New York metro area, for reference). 

  • Transition gradually. Obviously the easiest way to keep your up-front costs down when going vegan is to do so gradually, replacing your normal meat/eggs/dairy products with vegan versions as you run out of them. This is a really good option for people on a really tight budget, or who understandably don’t know if they can handle making such a massive change in one go. 
  • Sales fliers are your friend. Seriously, if you don’t already read the sales circulars that get sent to your house START NOW. When I went vegan two years ago I timed it with my local grocery store’s “can-can sale,” where they basically put every non-perishable item in the store on sale, which allowed me to stock up on stuff like beans and almond milk for a reasonable price. I still read the sales fliers every week and make a list of what’s cheapest where, then plan my shopping trips accordingly. These usually have coupons you can clip for extra savings, too.
  • Try to avoid specialty vegan foods. Mock meats and vegan cheeses like Daiya are great, but they’re expensive as fuck and drive your overall food cost up. They definitely have their place, since they’re convenient and help with cravings especially at the beginning, so if you want to include them that’s totally understandable, just remember that moderation is key. I try not to buy more than one of these items per shopping trip, or if they happen to be on sale I’ll buy a couple packs and freeze them (Daiya especially freezes well, just make sure if you have a block that you grate it beforehand or it gets weird). Otherwise, try to find whole-food options that you can sub instead: make veggie burgers from rice and beans, use avocado on sandwiches instead of cheese. These tend to be both cheaper and healthier.
  • Buy dried beans instead of canned. Dried beans are a LOT cheaper than canned, and usually taste better so it’s sort of a win/win. I’m not gonna lie to you, they ARE time intensive but you can get around this easily by 1) cooking them in a slow-cooker if you have one (soak them overnight in the cooker pot thing, throw them on low before you leave for work in the morning and VOILA) or 2) cooking big batches and freezing individual servings once or twice a month (this is my preferred method because I’m awful at meal planning and never realize I need beans until I’m already cooking).
  • Invest in spices. Spices will make even the cheapest, blandest food taste awesome. Rice and beans for the 6th night in a row because it’s an off pay week? Add some cumin and chili powder, delicious. Pasta again? Throw some Italian seasoning and garlic in there, or make peanut sauce with some ginger powder. Dollar stores typically have a good selection of spices for cheap, or if you have a health food store nearby with a bulk section that’s a good option too.
  • Find a cheap source of produce. Obligatory disclaimer this may not be possible for everyone, but one of the biggest godsends for me was finding a place to buy fresh produce on the cheap. I live in an area with a lot of indoor “farmers markets” (which is misleading because their produce is 99% of the time not farm-fresh) that have awesome prices on fresh produce (like, 1/2 the price of the supermarket), but in your area you might want to try a discount grocer like Aldi or actual farm markets/stands. Comparison shopping is definitely key here. Even just buying in-season produce can cut costs significantly.

These are just a start, and how cheaply you can eat is definitely gonna vary by your geographic location, the season, etc. But keeping this in mind you can definitely go and stay vegan without spending your entire paycheck on food.

(via janedoughxvx)

(Source: sandandglass, via peta2)

tinypawpets:

Bath time for the babies!!!

(Don’t worry, the water is only 2 inches deep, warm but not hot, and the soap is non-toxic to them)

(via finedineonmyvegangenitalia)

herbivorewarrior:

Aight, here’s the deal about veganism:

It isn’t about whether or not humans are meant to be omnivores, and it’s not about whether or not we’re smarter than other animals. 

It’s the fact that we can live a life that doesn’t involve harming other creatures. We have the ability to thrive on only plants, and we have the cognitive ability to choose what we eat, or wear, or support.

We can choose not to harm others, so why would you ever choose otherwise? 

(via queerblueberry)

kazuha159:


flashinglightsandecstasy:

musicalbunny:

I think this is necessary to post. I see a lot of people “saving” bunnies.

"*Bunnies are one of the most frequently “kidnapped” mammal species.*Mothers dig a very shallow nest in the ground that is easily uncovered when mowing or raking the yard. If you find a rabbit nest-leave it alone!!*Mother rabbits only return to the nest two or three times a day, usually before dawn and right after dusk. *To determine if they are orphaned, either place a string across the nest in a tic-tac-toe shape or circle the nest with flour. Check the nest the next day. If the string or flour is disturbed, the mother has returned. If not, take the bunnies to a rehabilitator.* A bunny that is bright eyed and 4-5 inches long is fully independent and does NOT need to be rescued!*If you find a bunny that does need to be rescued, put it in a dark, quiet location. Bunnies are a prey species and while they may look calm, they are actually very, very scared!”


Never knew this, keeping this for reference

As a student of Veterinary Medicine I can completely confirm this! Do NOT take them out of their nest unless you’re 100% sure that the mother did not come back for them after at least one day!

kazuha159:

flashinglightsandecstasy:

musicalbunny:

I think this is necessary to post. I see a lot of people “saving” bunnies.

"*Bunnies are one of the most frequently “kidnapped” mammal species.
*Mothers dig a very shallow nest in the ground that is easily uncovered when mowing or raking the yard. If you find a rabbit nest-leave it alone!!
*Mother rabbits only return to the nest two or three times a day, usually before dawn and right after dusk. 
*To determine if they are orphaned, either place a string across the nest in a tic-tac-toe shape or circle the nest with flour. Check the nest the next day. If the string or flour is disturbed, the mother has returned. If not, take the bunnies to a rehabilitator.
* A bunny that is bright eyed and 4-5 inches long is fully independent and does NOT need to be rescued!
*If you find a bunny that does need to be rescued, put it in a dark, quiet location. Bunnies are a prey species and while they may look calm, they are actually very, very scared!”

Never knew this, keeping this for reference

As a student of Veterinary Medicine I can completely confirm this! Do NOT take them out of their nest unless you’re 100% sure that the mother did not come back for them after at least one day!

(via movingonward)

txtrillkucci:

Hi. I am a volunteer worker for Austin pets alive! && I would like to introduce you to the “lonely hearts club” at our downtown facility. These beauties have been with us for far too long && they would love to be apart of you’re family! As you can see, they are mostly pitbulls but they are sweet angels && just like rest of our dogs, they need love && care. They only difference is they’ve been with us for 6 months to a year && this simply can not do.

Please, if you’re in the Austin area, open up your hearts && home to a loving dog. If you’re considering adoption, message me for location details.

Thank you from me && the lonely hearts club.

(via guacamolebeautyqueen)

Tags: adopt